Wikia

MST3K Wiki

Boggy Creek II: and the Legend Continues…

Talk0
793pages on
this wiki
...to be not heard about by anyone.
  — Servo


1006 - Boggy Creek II: And the Legend Continues…
1006
Air Date May 9, 1999
AKA The Barbaric Beast of Boggy Creek, Part II
Movie Director Charles B. Pierce
Year 1985
Cast Charles B. Pierce
Chuck Pierce
Cindy Butler
Serene Hedin
Preceded by 1005 - Blood Waters of Dr. Z
Followed by 1007 - Track of the Moon Beast

The Movie

Synopsis

For nearly ten years, the swamps of Texarkana, Arkansas, have been quiet. But now, residents are once again having sightings of the Boggy Creek Creature, only this time, the creature is very aggressive. After numerous townfolk are attacked, anthropologist Brian C. Lockhart (Charles B. Pierce) is called in to investigate the reports. "Doc" Lockhart, his son (who appears to be suffering from the beginnings of a muscle-wasting disease and indusiumphobia, fear of shirts) and two female students (one of whom seems to be on break from clown college) assemble some sciency-looking equipment and, braving the suspicions of the less-than-friendly rural populace, head out to the forest and then along the Sulfur River to look for answers. [1]

Don't buy what this movie's selling -- no one from Arkansas is "city folk."

Information

  • Even though this movie is entitled Boggy Creek II, it is actually the third movie of the Boggy Creek series. The producer of the original Boggy Creek didn't have anything to do with the first Boggy Creek II, so he decided to ignore that one and make this as the sequel. [2]
  • Victor Williams played the "Little Creature". Most recently he starred as Deacon on The King of Queens.
  • Charles B. Pierce, writer/producer/director/star of Boggy Creek II, died March 5, 2010 at the age of 71.

The Episode

Host Segments

1006 3

Presenting van Gogh's "self portrait with bandaged ear"

Prologue: Mike and Crow are in uniform for their cub scout meeting, but Tom's choice of a brownie costume due to his body style and keen eye for a bargain ostracizes him. Crow declines to think of Tom as a "she-belo."

Segment One: Tom's second choice of Flemish glass blower costumer fares no better, while down in Castle Forrester Pearl prepares to use grade school science to control the world's power. Things go wrong when Bobo misunderstands Pearl's command to get large quantity of potatoes and the SOL crew are unable to supply an acceptable replacement foodstuff.

Segment Two: Crow and Tom are fighting until Mike breaks them up, only to forget why he came there in the first place. The bots and Mike decide to use flashbacks to help him remember.

Segment Three: Inspired by the movie and smelling a buck, Pearl invents the legend of the Monster of Forrester Swamp complete with Brain Guy's singing a folk song about the mysterious creature. The SOL crew repeatedly point out it's Bobo.

Segment Four: Tom has taken up whittling in a big way, opting to commercialize and expand his interest into big business with WHITLtech.

Closing (Segment Five): Lord a'mercy, Crow has to tend to his fires, until the Bots get bored with playing "Smelly Mountain Man and Baby Critter" and leave Mike to clear up the mess. Meanwhile, the Legend of Forrester Swamp giftshop receives an eager young visitor whose dreams are shattered when the Legend makes an appearance.

Stinger: "I saw the little creature." "Nooo!!"

Other Notes

Guest Stars

Obscure References

  • "Way to go, Servo!. You're better than that guy who wrote that thing about remembering stuff!"

A reference to the novel 'In Search of Lost Time' by Marcel Proust, which has been called "the greatest novel of the 20th century".

  • "This is 'Rich Man, Poor Man' font!"

A reference to the 1976 TV miniseries Rich Man, Poor Man.

  • "It was the third of December..."

Servo is misquoting the opening line from the Temptations song "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone".

  • Crow and Servo sing the lyrics to Ferlin Husky's "Wings of a Dove" to the movie's theme music at several points.
  • "It's the Orval Faubus museum!"

Orval Faubus was the governor of Arkansas during the 1950s, and is best remembered for resisting federal efforts to desegregate Little Rock's public schools.

  • "I'm gonna look at Oui for a while."

Oui is a "men's" magazine published by Playboy Enterprises.

  • "It's William Perry!"

William "The Refrigerator" Perry was the defensive lineman for the Chicago Bears during the late 1980s.

  • "Lucy Braless!"

A punning reference to actress Lucy Lawless, best known for playing the title role on Xena: Warrior Princess.

  • "A bunch of Shmoos are attacking!"

The Shmoo was a fictional creature from the comic strip "Li'l Abner".

  • "Viv Savage, Research Assistant!"

Viv Savage was one of the keyboard players for the fictional heavy metal band Spinal Tap.

  • "Pat Conroy at home!"

Novelist Pat Conroy's works are heavily influenced by his experiences growing up in the South with an abusive father.

  • "It's the Arkansas remake of 'Wages of Fear'!"

The Wages of Fear is a 1953 film about truck drivers hauling explosives through a South American jungle.

  • "Checking on the land they bought from the Clintons!" "Now they stumble on the Rose Law Firm billing records!" "Ken Starr witness!"

Allusions to the Whitewater scandal.

  • "A wolf?" "Do you think it will survive?"

A reference to the Los Lobos album "How Will the Wolf Survive?"

  • "Ranger Rick goes berserk!"

Ranger Rick is a children's nature magazine with a raccoon mascot by the same name.

  • "Call the Pinkertons for me!"

During the late 19th century, agents of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency were often hired by industrialists to infiltrate and sabotage labor unions, and to "protect" factories and mines from striking workers.

  • "Now *this* is the boat they should have taken over that mountain in 'Fitzcarraldo'!"

Fitzcarraldo is a 1982 film about a Peruvian rubber baron.

  • "Hey, Mark Knopfler is hot!"

Mark Knopfler was the lead singer and guitarist of Dire Straits.

  • "You can take a seat on the skin chair!"

An allusion to Ed Gein, a serial killer arrested in Minnesota in 1957, who became infamous for making clothing and furniture from his victims' remains.

  • "You kidnapped Gene Shalit!"

Gene Shalit is the bushy-haired former movie critic for The Today Show.

  • "Snap into a Slim Jim!"

Quoted from a series of Slim Jim commercials featuring wrestler "Macho Man" Randy Savage.

Video Release

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki